Girl develops Lyme disease signs after giving delivery

Girl develops Lyme disease signs after giving delivery

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Of their article, “An Uncommon Case of Serologically Confirmed Put up-Partum Lyme Illness Following an Asymptomatic Borrelia burgdorferi An infection Acquired throughout Being pregnant and Missing Vertical Transmission in Utero,” Pavia et al. describe the case of a younger girl who developed signs of Lyme disease instantly following the delivery of her little one. [1]

A 23-year-old girl, who lived in Brooklyn, NY, had visited her major care physician complaining of bilateral knee swelling and ache. Three days prior, she had delivered a wholesome child woman.

The ache was reported as 8/10 in severity and was exacerbated by strolling, according to the authors.

When the lady was 6 months pregnant, she skilled comparable knee ache briefly however by no means sought therapy.

“Curiously, aside from a quick 2-day interval the place she skilled knee ache, she remained symptom-free for Lyme disease for the rest of the being pregnant.”

Throughout her being pregnant the lady had taken a number of journeys to wooded areas in upstate New York.

She denied any recognized publicity to ticks or the event of any rash.

Testing for Lyme disease was constructive by Western blot with a number of reactive bands together with: 18, 23, 28, 33, 41,43, 58, 66, and 93 kDa.

The girl was handled efficiently with a 3-week course of doxycycline.

Her new child was symptom-free at delivery and has by no means proven any of the same old indicators or signs of lively illness nicely into early childhood and past, the authors state.

Based on the authors, “There was no proof for congenital or perinatal transmission of this pathogen at any level pre-term or postnatally.”

References:
  1. Pavia CS, Plummer MM, Varantsova A. An Uncommon Case of Serologically Confirmed Put up-Partum Lyme Illness Following an Asymptomatic Borrelia burgdorferi An infection Acquired throughout Being pregnant and Missing Vertical Transmission in Utero. Pathogens. 2024 Feb 20;13(3):186. doi: 10.3390/pathogens13030186. PMID: 38535530; PMCID: PMC10976031.



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